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April 07, 2016 by Andrius Bialyj

This time we are sharing our Tips&Tricks article that was published in RevitCommunity some time ago. Hope it can be useful not only for RevitCommunity readers but for our blog followers too. So please read and benefit from advices on how to work smarter without using Revit plugins.


To get more realistic and high quality render requires a lot of time working on details. However we don’t always need to have exact details or spend time on them, therefore there are big model libraries on the internet for rendering purposes. Those might contain trees, grass, site elements, furniture, and so on.

Unfortunately those are usually not suitable for Autodesk® Revit® as they are mostly used by visualization professionals who use visualization software like 3ds Max, Cinema 4D, etc. However we can get quite good results using one of the suggested Revit rendering engines.

First, I would suggest you to begin with a separate Revit project for our rendering and then just link the main project into it. In that case, we won’t overload our main project with all detailed geometry that will be used only for rendering purposes.

November 17, 2015 by Andrius Bialyj

As the software, hardware and technologies are always improving we would like to have more and more information in our BIM models, and we would like this information to meet BIM criterions – it must have its geometry, materials, actual quantity and all the information we might need about some parts of the project or its elements

Often various detail drawings or just detail elements we draw in 2D, mark its places in the project and calculate approximate quantity. We usually do that because our clients don’t ask for these details as those are being coordinated at the construction site, or distribution of these detail elements takes too much time. However various details are quite important in our projects, especially in precast elements or structural models.

Fortunately, there is a new BIM solution that quickly distributes detail elements or even specific cuts to your Revit® elements according to predefined rules – AGACAD team has created a new BIM solution for Revit called Smart Details. The tool is currently in Beta version, however everyone can try it out for free. After the installation of the tool you will see a new tab in your Revit ribbon with Smart Details tool’s functions inside.

All functions are quite similar and their names are self-explanatory, therefore it’s quite obvious what they are for.

September 29, 2015 by Andrius Bialyj

Again, we would like to share advice on how to work smarter with Revit® without using any plugins. Just a simple but useful tip.

Sometimes not everything can be finished in Autodesk® Revit®, so we need to use another software for some tasks. In some cases we need to have 3D view (axonometric or perspective) drawing of our project outside of Revit, so that it can be edited or simplified (for example for logo or advertisement).

The problem is that if you export 3D view, you get 3D model of your project and it’s complicated to make it 2D (“Flatten” command in AutoCAD doesn’t work properly in most of the cases). However there is a simple solution for that.

All you have to do is just follow a few simple steps:

May 20, 2015 by Andrius Bialyj

Last time I have explained you how to transfer views, family types, elements etc. between different Revit® projects. This time I would like to tell you how to restore lost elements using Revit backup files or copies.

Imagine you are working on a big project and you notice that some Revit® elements that were modeled before are missing - a few hours or even days ago. That might happen on workshared projects when team members don’t own worksets and everybody can edit anything. So sometimes someone accidently might delete someone else’s elements.

To transfer the missing elements, you need to find a backup file where the elements are still in their place, or a local copy of the project that wasn’t synchronized with the central file for some time (and has the missing elements in it). Now you have to open both projects in Revit. The best way to transfer elements is in plan views, so activate in both projects the same level plan views. Mark the elements in the project were they are still in their place (you can use right click and Select All Instances >Visible in View or just select all and filter the required elements). Note that you don’t need to select hosts for host based elements, if the host is not deleted in the more recent project.

May 13, 2015 by Andrius Bialyj

Autodesk® Revit® can save a lot of time working on similar or big projects. Best way for that are Revit project templates.

Revit users can save system families (walls, floors etc.), component families (doors, windows, furniture etc.), sheets, schedules, annotations, graphics and so on to their project templates, therefore starting a new project, a lot of time can be saved skipping creation of schedules or importing needed families. However projects are different and we can’t create template that will suit all projects or few templates that we can choose from our new project and the chosen template will fit it 100%.

There are even situations when, for example, schedules from multiple different projects have to be used in a new project. Also, sometimes beginners forget to use required project template and have problems transferring their work to a project template. There is a partial solution for that using Revit project linking, binding it afterwards, while losing annotations, detail items, views etc. but this topic is not about this way.

First of all, let’s see how the system family types, annotations, tags, view templates etc. can be transferred between projects (those are just types, not designed elements of the project).

March 02, 2015 by Andrius Bialyj

In the first part of the tutorial I spoke about how to create a generic wall mounted railings. In this part I will explain how to adjust those railings and be more precise on the detail.

This is the tricky part. If you, before selecting the railing, press Tab on your keyboard and select only the handrail you will be able to reach handrail properties. In Instance Properties tab only Identity Data fields can be changes but in Type Properties window plenty of useful parameter can be found.

February 11, 2015 by Andrius Bialyj

Our streamed news readers know that we share our BIM advances in productivity enhancement working with Revit®. Usually we talk about how Revit plugins can help you to simplify your workflow. But this time we would like to share advices on how to work smarter without using Revit plugins. No additional software is required for this tutorial – all tools are available in standard Revit interface. So, now we suggest Tips & Tricks from AGA CAD on how to go into next Level of Detail (LOD) to create wall mounted railings.

For many Revit users railings seem to be limited in flexibility. However advanced users can achieve various results using Revit railing families. In this tutorial I will explain how to create and adjust wall mounted railings.

First of all, let's create any railings or any stairs that include railings on it, next to a wall or a corner. In standard Revit templates railings have balusters which go down to the host of the railing.

As railing is a Revit system family we can't create it from scratch therefore we have to duplicate an existing family. So let's select existing railing and in Instance Properties window select Edit Type tool.

Thank you.

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